New courses join LHS’ curriculum

New courses join LHS' curriculum

Lindsey Paradis, A & E Editor

Ludlow High School has always had only the basic classes, but with the school year of 2012-2013 soon approaching, the school looks to gain a wide spectrum of new courses in the form of  electives.

Principal Lisa Nemeth presented 29 new half- and full-year courses to the school committee on  Jan. 24 that look to be piloted during the next school year.

With most courses being only one semester long, Nemeth believes it caters to students because “if you don’t like it you are done in January and have a new class.”

Nemeth stated early in the year her goal was to bring electives to LHS, and she has done just that. She thinks these new courses are “need oriented,” and are “career courses.”

Classes will run based on student interest. If a small amount sign up, the class may be cancelled.

Junior John Ferrera seems interested in the new courses, “I was going to take VHS, but it’s good were getting them in school where you can be one-on-one with teachers.”

Here is a list of all the classes (all classes are half year unless marked full year);

Art Department

Art Exploration

Intro to Drawing and Painting

Advanced Drawing and Painting

Intro to Ceramics

Honors Ceramics 2

Art throughout the Ages

Printmaking

Honors Advanced Art (full year)

Honors Art Portfolio (full year)

 

Business Department

Internet and Web Page Design/ HTML 2 (full year)

Investing in the Stock Market Internet Based

Emerging Technologies in the 21st Century

International Business

Video Game Design and Development

English Department

AP English Language & Composition (full year) – for juniors

Public Speaking

Creative Writing

Drama

Modern Languages Department

Latin American Culture

Latin Dance

My Version of Don Quijote

Arts from Spain

Polish for Heritage 1

Polish for Heritage 2

Mathematics Department

AP Statistics (full year)

PE Department

Cinematography of High School Life Skills

Science Department

AP Physics B (full year)

Social Studies Department;

Local History

Turmoil in the 20th Century

 

No new teachers will be hired to help with the new classes, so all the new courses would have to be taught by a current teacher and fit into their schedule.

Guidance’s Linda Duame states “were finding a way [to make it work] without having to ask for additional teachers.”

Students will have the opportunity to sign up for these new classes Feb. 9.