English Language Arts MCAS returns this March

Felicia Robare, News Editor

For sophomores, MCAS English Language Arts will take place on Tuesday March 24 through Thursday March 26. MCAS stands for Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System, which is the  Commonwealth’s statewide assessment to evaluate school, students, district performance.

The MCAS ELA consists of session one, session two, and the long composition and will test the students to evaluate how much the students have learned. The first two sessions are multiple choice and open response comprehension tests.

“I’m most worried about the long composition,” says sophomore Gregory Babin, “but I feel like my teachers have prepared me well enough so I can do my best on the writing.”

Some districts are giving the long composition essay on April 2 due to the numerous snow days that were taken this year. Some districts near Boston have used up to 10 snow days.

Students have from 7:25 to 10:30 to take the MCAS before other grades come into school. This will eliminate any distractions like bells. If students are not finished by 10:30 they will be escorted to the library for more time.

“I like that I have until the end of the day to finish because I have really messy handwriting,” says Babin. “I am able to take my time and write legible because I have until 1:55 to finish.”

If students do not finish by 10:30 they will be given a lunch break.

The freshmen, juniors, and seniors do not need to report to school until 10:30, however, if they need to come to school beforehand they will be sent to the cafeteria where they must remain quiet until school starts.

“I love when they have MCAS,” says freshman Stephanee Bouthiller. “I get to sleep in and come into school late.”

Many sophomores have already begun studying to ensure that they will get proficient or advanced. But along with the kids that study early and work hard, there are also students who worry about the test.

Students stress over the test, making it hard for them to focus.

“I’m not really good at testing so I feel like I’m going to struggle with the test,” says sophomore Kyle La Fleur. “I don’t agree with the MCAS for the reasons that kids that struggle with testing, such as myself, are judged on what we know, when we know so much more than the test leads you to believe. I panic and over think every question. I second guess myself. The MCAS is there to judge our knowledge, not to put the pressure on us to feel like if we fail, that we won’t succeed.”

All public school students including grades 3 thru 8 and grade 10 are required to take the MCAS.